My ideal audience is everyone, so why aren’t they buying?

Well it’s because they are not. Everybody is not your target audience whatever your brand or business might be. Need proof? Let’s use Coca Cola as an example. Taking an outside view of Coca Cola’s business model, their target audience might seem to be anybody that drinks, which is basically, everyone.

But Coca Cola’s marketing team see the benefit of defining their audience and targeting certain sectors of an audience. Coca cola’s target market is in fact a younger generation of between the ages of 15 – 30. They could probably go lower in age but have signed up to be a reasonable marketing company. Respecting and supporting the role as a parent and a caregiver they will not market any products directly to children under 12.

Still questioning the age range? That’s because of Coca Cola’s great marketing technique. Their imagery, TV commercials and live events always involve young characters, and even when someone older appears it’s normally because they are being handed a cola by someone of youth. Coca Cola create an environment that young people want to be in, they convince them that cola can give them the paradise seen across their marketing ads and at a very low cost. They communicate based on archetypes, giving a message of desire and goodness, while displaying their brand as idyllic trust and dependence. They show and demonstrate brotherly love, friendship/love, forgiveness, family appreciation and sex each time targeting the audience that is most suited to that theme.

I realise finding your audience can be difficult especially for new businesses. Hopefully, the above example can help explain and guide you on defining your audience but below are a few more tips based around the frustrations I hear.

Who should I sell to?

I believe you fundamentally have to understand who you’re selling to. You need to identity your ideal client. Can you image if Coca Cola just said everybody? They would waste a lot of money on marketing to those that will never buy or those that don’t need an incentive to buy. Because let’s remember those people, that don’t need a nudge to buy. As a salesperson don’t spend longer than you need to close the sale, get the sale and move on. Defining your audience will help not only define those that will buy but how long you need to spend selling.

Why should I bother, a scatter gun approach will work?

The truth is, it will. But how much time and money do you want to spend targeting and speaking to everyone. Not knowing your target market can reduce your sales conversion rate, example from 25% to 10%, so instead of making a sale every 1 in 4 you’re making 1 sale in 10. With the average sale needing 8 touch points, that’s an additional 48 meetings for the same amount of sales.

I’m new to business, how can I figure this out?

Being a new business is hard, but as highlighted in the Coca Cola example there are many marketing strategies broken down in text and video throughout the internet. Some of which will sell similar products to yourself. They might be at a different level of business but their strategy can easily be adapted to a local market and to your audience.

Also don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Apple, one of the biggest technology companies spent years not just finding their ideal audience but building the right products to work with that audience. In 1998 Steve Jobs returned to the company and had to quickly change the logo from multicoloured to plain black because they could no longer afford to print it in colour. Take notes and learn from yours and other’s mistakes. I’m not expecting anybody to discover their ideal customer overnight.

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